Posts tagged 3-Recommendation
“Emotions Revealed” by Paul Ekman

If you ever wanted to know if someone was being dishonest, or trying to deceive you with a friendly smile, putting emotions under the microscope and understanding where these emotions come from can be a critical bargaining tool at the diplomat’s arsenal. To help us recognise emotions and how to connect more effectively with others, we recommend the book “Emotions Revealed: Recognising faces and feelings to improve communication and emotional life” by Paul Ekman.

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“I'm OK, You're OK” by Thomas A. Harris

As part of your diplomacy training, it is important for you to see how your past links with how you think in your day-to-day life so that you can make decisions that are not filtered by your past experiences. To help you get to grips with this psychological understanding of yourself, we recommend the book “I’m OK, You’re OK” by Thomas A. Harris, in support of Chapter 3 - “Enhancing Emotional Intelligence” of the Diplomatic Planner.

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“The Power Paradox” by Dacher Keltner

There is no doubt that many think of diplomats as power possessors. Diplomats have an opportunity to grow investments for their country and influence foreign policy based on their assessments and analyses. Head of Missions are given great titles and are referred to as “Your Excellency” in formal occassions. But what is the meaning of power? How can diplomats use power to gain and lose influence?

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“The Discomfort Zone” by Marcia Reynolds

Diplomats are respected and sought-after interlocutors, negotiators, translators and bridge buildings for their country. As an official representative of broad business and investment relationship, it is the job of a diplomat to grease the clogs and keep two countries in good stead with one another. But diplomats are often put in positions of difficulty when there are disagreements and conflict of interest. How do you better handle discomfort when avoidance is not an option? How do you keep the conversation going when the subject is clearly embarrassing or painful? How do you create safe zones when the person you are speaking with clearly does not trust you or value your leadership position? 

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“Humble Inquiry" by Edgar H. Schein

When we think about diplomacy in layman’s term, we think about communication and the art of politeness. To be ‘diplomatic’ means having the skills to deal with people in a sensitive and tactful way so as to not offend or reproach. Therefore, how we use language also must be used diplomatically to ensure that our tone, intonation, emphasis and more importantly, our meaning does not misconstrued or cause unintentional upset.

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“The Stuff of Thought” by Steven Pinker

When we think about diplomacy in layman’s term, we think about communication and the art of politeness. To be ‘diplomatic’ means having the skills to deal with people in a sensitive and tactful way so as to not offend or reproach. Therefore, how we use language also must be used diplomatically to ensure that our tone, intonation, emphasis and more importantly, our meaning does not misconstrued or cause unintentional upset.

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“The Age of Empathy” by Mark Goulston

Sometimes, it is difficult to see the good in our world, particularly when we are bombarded by negative news, stories of atrocities, shameful acts from corrupt politicians, people who are egotistical and go out of their to improve their position, regardless of the negative impact their actions have on others. Being knee deep in the world of international relations, we are constantly surrounded by such types of news and actions, and it can be difficult to keep treading water above such heavy activities.

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“Talking to Crazy” by Mark Goulston

Some of the previous books we recommended focuses on personality traits, speaking with difficult people, and dealing with the emotions of others which complement many of the exercises from chapter three of the Diplomatic Planner. However, we also need to acknowledge that we also have the potential of experiencing mood swings and displaying irrational behaviour from time to time. Perhaps even going into a full blown “crazy mode”.

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“Personality” by Daniel Nettle

What makes life so rich is that we are all different. When we embrace diversity in its fullest, we all get a rich experience and learn so much from each other. That is a utopian view for everyone to just get along like one big happy family but we know from experience working in the international relations field that our differences has led to war, genocide and everyday hate. So what makes us different?

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“Emotional Intelligence” by Daniel Goleman

You can’t learn about emotional intelligence without reading one of the most fundamental books that examines the role of emotional intelligence by a leading psychologist in the field. As a science journalist, author Daniel Goleman is a worldwide expert on emotional intelligence, having written many books on social and emotional learning, self-deception and destructive emotions.

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“Dangerous Personalities” by Joe Navarro

When it comes to creating harmony at work, sometimes we have no choice but to work with and for people who do not align with our personal ethics, way of doing things, or way of thinking. Under such circumstances, how do you operate in the best way possible knowing that your Ambassador, head of State, Head of Department, whatever the case may be, start to become dangerous and very difficult to work with?

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